“Texas News and Views” Radio Show Features Tyler Jacobs of Hall and Hall

Texas Farm Bureau’s “Texas News and Views” radio program recently featured Hall and Hall partner, Tyler Jacobs, commenting about insurance considerations for those buying or selling rural property.

Here is a link to the program.

TylerJacobsTyler lives and ranches five miles outside of Montgomery, TX.   Graduating from Texas Tech University with his degree in Wildlife and Fisheries management, he has had professional and entrepreneurial experience in hunting operations, timber valuation, cow/calf and yearling operations, grass-fed beef production, and land-use planning. Currently serving as President of the Texas Land Brokers Network, he also is an affiliated member of RLI, TSCRA, MCBIA, and TALB. A proud fifth-generation Texan, Tyler holds the legacy of land ownership in the highest regard.

 

Yaggy Plantation Sells to Television Producer at Auction

On October 5th, American TV executive Craig Piligian and his actress/dancer wife Lucinda Piligian purchased the historic Reno County, Kansas Yaggy Plantation at auction for $5.325 million. Piligian is the President and CEO of Pilgrim Films & Television and best known for creating The Ultimate Fighter, American Chopper and Dirty Jobs series for Discovery Channel. In 2001, he won an Emmy Award as co-Executive Producer of Survivor.

The 1,260-acre property was once the largest shipping point for fruit between the Missouri River and California. In fact, at one time it had as many as 50,000 apple trees and a million catalpa trees – which were sold for fence posts and railroad ties.

The two homes, which are accessed from a quarter-mile tree-lined drive, still reflect the period. The south home was built first, in 1892, as a manufactured Sears and Roebuck home that was shipped in by rail. The north house, built around 1905, has a similar floor plan, with five bedrooms. The home was refurbished in 2005.

“There were 100+ in attendance and 25 registered bidders,” said Scott Shuman of Hall and Hall Auctions.  ”There was constant and lively bidding on a variety of tracts and combinations, yet the property sold to a single bidder.

To read the full story of the sale click here.

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A Father’s Colorado Dream

By: Rob Hart

My father has always loved Colorado.  As a kid, we drove all the way from Arkansas in the summer, in the winter, and any other time he could convince my mom that experiencing the outdoors was just as important as school.  We got the full experience – whitewater rafting, skiing, visiting the national parks, horseback riding, hiking, rock climbing, fishing and camping.

Besides the usual fun activities, there was the inevitable and infinite quest to find a little piece of Colorado land we could call our own.  Dad has always dreamed of owning land in Colorado and every single trip included a day of property exploration.  There was rarely a “for sale” sign that we passed without exploring the possibilities.  We walked, hiked and climbed them all, but most proved to be too expensive for our situation or were only accessible by a team of mountain goats.

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Life has gotten in the way and he’s yet to find the perfect place to hang his hat.  However, I’ve learned that it was the search and the dreams that he most enjoyed.  There has never been a tract of land where Dad did not see the possibilities.  “This would be the perfect place for a very, very small cabin.” “You’d have to bolt a house to the side of the cliff, but you could certainly teach the kids to repel and climb.” “It might be a flood plain, but it will be a great place to kayak and fish.” – or – “This one is right next to the national forest, you’d just have to hire a team of mules to get you over there.”

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Regardless of the ultimate purchase possibilities, we always ran across some of the most gorgeous places on this earth.  Lush green forests, crystal clear rushing creeks, miles and miles of endless views, and meadows that made you want to stay all night and try to count the stars. Colorado really is one of the most amazing places on the earth.

The childhood experiences of exploring the unknown and dreaming of the possibilities has had a permanent impact on me.  I can’t remember ever telling a single person that my professional goals were to work in real estate, much less specialize in large tracts of land.  I now find myself living in Colorado doing exactly what I was unconsciously raised to love.  I find no better comfort than spending the day wandering through the back roads of Colorado looking for that perfect place to build that cabin, hunt, fish, kayak and camp.

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Dad and I still haven’t found our little slice of heaven, but at 74 years old he hasn’t given up the search and mine has just begun.  Last week while visiting we went for our annual land run through the Colorado mountains.  As expected, we didn’t find the perfect place but I won’t be disappointed if we never do.  I know now, it’s not about finding perfection but the search that keeps the spirit alive.

Historic Kansas Ranch Heads to Auction October 5th

Yaggy Plantation, a 1,260+/- acre property only minutes from Hutchinson, KS will be auctioned to the public on October 5, 2016 in five tracts and combinations. The property offers a unique mixture of irrigated farmland, a mile plus of Arkansas River frontage, a historic homestead with two residences, dryland acreage and hunting cover. It has been in the same family for 130 years. For more information, contact John Wildin of Hall and Hall at 620-662-0411 or visit http://hallhall.com/ranches-for-sale/properties/yaggy-plantation.

“Back in early 1900’s Yaggy Plantation was a very large and successful apple farm with roughly 50,000 apple trees,” said Wildin.  “Also, according to historical documents, it had more than 1,000,000 catalpa trees that were harvested for fence posts and railroad ties. The plentiful crop diversity is due to the water under this land being plentiful and shallow.”

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There are two large historic homes situated on a tree-lined drive with expansive lawns. Both two-story houses have front and back porches, numerous bedrooms, brick fireplaces and hardwood floors, all in a beautiful setting amongst mature trees. The north home (c.1905) was faithfully refurbished in 2005. The south home (c.1892) was ordered as a prefabricated house from Sears & Roebuck and delivered to the site by train.

Yaggy Plantation is all contiguous land, without any public roads through the property. It is roughly two miles wide and one mile deep. Well over a mile of the south boundary lies along the north bank of the Arkansas River, the sixth longest river in the U.S. Hardwood and softwood trees are scattered throughout the land intermittently in rows and large stands along the river. A huge grove of catalpa trees provides the most secure sanctuary for the many varied wildlife species found here, including mature whitetail bucks. In between the various tree groves and rows are fields of native grass that have been until recently enrolled in the federal Conservation Reserve Program. These are perfect fawning areas bounded by tree lines. The towering cottonwood trees along the river provide massive canopies for nearly the entire length of the riverbank.

“Keep in mind all of this land is contiguous, and yet is not impacted by public access anywhere through the property,” Wildin added.  “This truly is the premier wildlife sanctuary in the Midwest with whitetail deer, large flocks of wild turkey, ring-necked pheasants and the bobwhite quail.”

The north end of this land is the historically productive cropland, of which nearly 350 acres are pivot irrigated to produce prolific yields of corn, soybeans, milo and wheat. The sellers have permits for an additional 226+/- acres of pivot irrigation.

“The phrase ‘unique land offering’ is probably the most over-used description in the real estate world,” said Scott Shuman of Hall and Hall Auctions.  “But the 1,260± acre Yaggy Plantation defines exactly what that phrase is meant to describe. Just three miles from Hutchinson and only fifty-five miles from the Wichita airport, this is one of the most unique land offerings to come along in a long time.”

Montana Cattle Ranch Offers Unique Opportunity to Lease Tribal Land

The Crow Indian Reservation contains 2,296,000 acres in parts of Bighorn and Yellowstone County.  The  ownership of surface acres includes the Crow Tribe (455,719, 20%), individually allotted Indian trust (1,035,850, 45%), and private fee acreage (804,431, 35%). The pattern of surface ownership generally is “checkerboard” with interspersed tribal, trust and fee lands.

Over the years, this  has created a great opportunity for ranch owners to lease both the tribal and the individually allotted acres in what is  arguably the best grass country in Montana. An example of this is the Miller Cattle Company, a ranch which runs on approximately 14,270 deeded acres and 8,400+/- leased acres just minutes north of Crow Agency.  This ranch is currently listed with Hall and Hall for $12,850,000.

Miller Cattle Company

Miller Cattle Company

Located approximately 60 minutes’ drive east of Billings, this 800-plus AU balanced ranch lies in Montana’s finest ranching country. Running on approximately 22,670 acres, of which 14,270± are deeded, the ranch is conveniently located 10 minutes from Crow Agency adjacent to U.S. Highway 212. The ranch features high-quality and well-kept residential and agricultural improvements, productive farm ground, improved pasture, ample stock water, strong native grasses and a strong recreational component based upon good populations of pheasants and upland birds.

It features three comfortable homes from 1,400± to 3,200± square feet to go along with the very complete operating facilities. Excellent interior ranch roads allow for easy access to approximately 1,700± acres of tilled ground and nearly 2,000 acres of improved pasture. Multiple pastures and year-round live water enable efficient pasture rotations throughout the year. The Miller Cattle Company combines all the features needed to own and operate a full-scale cattle operation in the finest grass country in Montana.

he Miller Cattle Company combines all the features needed to own and operate a full-scale cattle operation in the finest grass country in Montana.

The Miller Cattle Company combines all the features needed to own and operate a full-scale cattle operation in the finest grass country in Montana.

 

 

Hall and Hall Brokers Historic Oklahoma Land Purchase by Osage Nation

Hall and Hall was honored to represent Ted Turner in the historic sale of his 43,000 acre Oklahoma ranch, known as Bluestem Ranch, to the Osage Nation. More than 300 Osage citizens gathered Wednesday to celebrate the purchase, a $74 million deal, which had been in the works since last year.

“It was an amazing experience to represent Ted Turner on this historic transaction,” said Hall and Hall Partner John Wildin. “He truly loves land and has become one of America’s greatest land stewards.”

Bluestem Ranch is 43,000 storied acres of Osage Nation history that now has a new story to tell.

Bluestem Ranch is 43,000 storied acres of Osage Nation history that now has a new story to tell.

Comprised of cross timbers and tallgrass prairie, the Bluestem Ranch is managed for bison grazing, which has proven to be very conducive to quality wildlife management. Bluestem’s primary species are whitetail deer, wild turkey and bobwhite quail. Waterfowl hunting and fishing are also popular.

The Osage Nation once owned nearly 1.5 million acres before the land was divided and distributed among individual tribe members in the early 1990s. Tribal holdings had decreased to less than 5 percent of the original Osage Reservation by the time Osage Nation Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear took office in 2014.

To learn more, watch this great news story by Oklahoma’s News on 6: “Land Purchase Returns Piece Of History To Osage Nation

“There's 20,190 of us, and we're scattered throughout the United States,” said Osage Nation Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear. “This land now belongs to all of us.”

“There’s 20,190 of us, and we’re scattered throughout the United States,” said Osage Nation Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear. “This land now belongs to all of us.”