Scott Shuman Named 69th National Auctioneers Association President

Scott Shuman, CAI, of Eaton, CO, and head of Hall and Hall Auctions will serve as President of the the National Auctioneers Association (NAA). After serving one year as NAA Vice President,  Shuman formally accepted office as NAA President on Thursday, July 13, during the NAA International Auctioneers Conference and Show.

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Thirty-two previous NAA presidents lined up at the sold out President’s Gala to officially pass the ceremonial gavel to Shuman. In fact, it was passed hand by hand along the line of previous presidents until it reached the hands of its newest recipient. Shuman described the ceremonial welcome as one of the best moments of his life.

In addition to Shuman’s accomplishments, Hall and Hall won three USA TODAY marketing awards at the conference.  Thank you to Krista and the rest of the Hall and Hall marketing team for their exceptional efforts.

Spring Fishing Report From Steamboat Springs, Colorado

By: Cody Lujan

At a time when the majority of Yampa Valley visitors and locals are enjoying the last runs of the ski season under bluebird skies, every savvy angler and guide with downtime is enjoying some of the best fishing of the year. The unpredictable and often brief window of opportunity known as “pre-runoff” begins as soon as ice begins to break up on the rivers and ends when melting snows drive river flows to peak runoff levels. Though tailwater fisheries and a few days of ice fishing on Steamboat Lake and Stagecoach Reservoir has gotten many a local angler through the winter, ice out on the Yampa, Elk, Williams Fork, and Colorado Rivers (not even mentioning some of the hidden gem tributaries) means two things; hungry fish and excellent fishing.

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Fish that have been subsisting under ice for a couple of months greet open water conditions with aggressive appetites. Indeed, some of the best streamer fishing of the year happens during “pre-runoff”. Though water clarity and stream flows can vary from day-to-day, swung and stripped streamers provide anglers with consistent action in both swift and slow moving holding waters. Warmer temperatures and clear water days can also provide dry fly action on midges and smaller stimulator patterns as well as decent nymph fishing. Though larger fish will readily strike big meaty streamers on the Yampa, Elk and Colorado during this time of year, scuds, San Juan worms, and most any flash-backed or bead-headed nymph will pick up plenty of fish for those interested in the numbers game. Streamers will rule on days defined by higher stream flows and off-color waters.

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Large and aggressive rainbow and brown trout seem to come out of the woodwork during pre-runoff, with many seemingly disappearing until the large terrestrial bugs of late summer or late fall feeding binges bring them back to the table. The waters of the Sky River Ranch and Elk River Sanctuary on the Elk River will produce good numbers of hefty rainbows as well as the occasional cutthroat or brown trout. With miles of high quality and very private stream fishing, Table Rock Ranch provides spring anglers with excellent opportunities for large rainbows and wild brown trout. For those seeking some of the largest browns and rainbows on the Yampa River, as well as huge northern pike and the occasional smallmouth bass, Ghost Ranch is your spring break destination.

Four Bear Ranch Profiled by LA Times

Four Bear Ranch, a 1,246-acre Cody, Wyoming mountain retreat and hunting property once home to “Gunsmoke” writer Ron Bishop, was recently profiled by The Los Angeles Times. While the article incorrectly states that Bishop owned the ranch, he did live in the Olive Fell house courtesy of the Weiss family – the owners of the Four Bear Ranch at that time.

An excerpt from the article reads:

“Set within a basin adjoining the Shoshone National Forest, the ranch has art and literary ties that precede Bishop’s ownership. Printmaker, painter and sculptor Olive Fell once owned the property, which has a guesthouse named for the noted artist. Adding to its pedigree, author Ernest Hemingway purportedly visited the ranch on a number of occasions.”

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Four Bear Ranch is an exceptionally convenient, easily accessible but totally private wilderness retreat near one of Wyoming’s sought-after communities. The ranch has a complete and totally appropriate set of improvements sited in one of the most dramatically beautiful locations imaginable. Wyoming’s status as a tax haven with no state income and inheritance tax cannot be ignored as well. It should also be noted that there are no conservation easements on the ranch, nor are there any other easements through the ranch.

“Texas News and Views” Radio Show Features Tyler Jacobs of Hall and Hall

Texas Farm Bureau’s “Texas News and Views” radio program recently featured Hall and Hall partner, Tyler Jacobs, commenting about insurance considerations for those buying or selling rural property.

Here is a link to the program.

TylerJacobsTyler lives and ranches five miles outside of Montgomery, TX.   Graduating from Texas Tech University with his degree in Wildlife and Fisheries management, he has had professional and entrepreneurial experience in hunting operations, timber valuation, cow/calf and yearling operations, grass-fed beef production, and land-use planning. Currently serving as President of the Texas Land Brokers Network, he also is an affiliated member of RLI, TSCRA, MCBIA, and TALB. A proud fifth-generation Texan, Tyler holds the legacy of land ownership in the highest regard.

 

Yaggy Plantation Sells to Television Producer at Auction

On October 5th, American TV executive Craig Piligian and his actress/dancer wife Lucinda Piligian purchased the historic Reno County, Kansas Yaggy Plantation at auction for $5.325 million. Piligian is the President and CEO of Pilgrim Films & Television and best known for creating The Ultimate Fighter, American Chopper and Dirty Jobs series for Discovery Channel. In 2001, he won an Emmy Award as co-Executive Producer of Survivor.

The 1,260-acre property was once the largest shipping point for fruit between the Missouri River and California. In fact, at one time it had as many as 50,000 apple trees and a million catalpa trees – which were sold for fence posts and railroad ties.

The two homes, which are accessed from a quarter-mile tree-lined drive, still reflect the period. The south home was built first, in 1892, as a manufactured Sears and Roebuck home that was shipped in by rail. The north house, built around 1905, has a similar floor plan, with five bedrooms. The home was refurbished in 2005.

“There were 100+ in attendance and 25 registered bidders,” said Scott Shuman of Hall and Hall Auctions.  ”There was constant and lively bidding on a variety of tracts and combinations, yet the property sold to a single bidder.

To read the full story of the sale click here.

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A Father’s Colorado Dream

By: Rob Hart

My father has always loved Colorado.  As a kid, we drove all the way from Arkansas in the summer, in the winter, and any other time he could convince my mom that experiencing the outdoors was just as important as school.  We got the full experience – whitewater rafting, skiing, visiting the national parks, horseback riding, hiking, rock climbing, fishing and camping.

Besides the usual fun activities, there was the inevitable and infinite quest to find a little piece of Colorado land we could call our own.  Dad has always dreamed of owning land in Colorado and every single trip included a day of property exploration.  There was rarely a “for sale” sign that we passed without exploring the possibilities.  We walked, hiked and climbed them all, but most proved to be too expensive for our situation or were only accessible by a team of mountain goats.

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Life has gotten in the way and he’s yet to find the perfect place to hang his hat.  However, I’ve learned that it was the search and the dreams that he most enjoyed.  There has never been a tract of land where Dad did not see the possibilities.  “This would be the perfect place for a very, very small cabin.” “You’d have to bolt a house to the side of the cliff, but you could certainly teach the kids to repel and climb.” “It might be a flood plain, but it will be a great place to kayak and fish.” – or – “This one is right next to the national forest, you’d just have to hire a team of mules to get you over there.”

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Regardless of the ultimate purchase possibilities, we always ran across some of the most gorgeous places on this earth.  Lush green forests, crystal clear rushing creeks, miles and miles of endless views, and meadows that made you want to stay all night and try to count the stars. Colorado really is one of the most amazing places on the earth.

The childhood experiences of exploring the unknown and dreaming of the possibilities has had a permanent impact on me.  I can’t remember ever telling a single person that my professional goals were to work in real estate, much less specialize in large tracts of land.  I now find myself living in Colorado doing exactly what I was unconsciously raised to love.  I find no better comfort than spending the day wandering through the back roads of Colorado looking for that perfect place to build that cabin, hunt, fish, kayak and camp.

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Dad and I still haven’t found our little slice of heaven, but at 74 years old he hasn’t given up the search and mine has just begun.  Last week while visiting we went for our annual land run through the Colorado mountains.  As expected, we didn’t find the perfect place but I won’t be disappointed if we never do.  I know now, it’s not about finding perfection but the search that keeps the spirit alive.