Four Bear Ranch Profiled by LA Times

Four Bear Ranch, a 1,246-acre Cody, Wyoming mountain retreat and hunting property once home to “Gunsmoke” writer Ron Bishop, was recently profiled by The Los Angeles Times. While the article incorrectly states that Bishop owned the ranch, he did live in the Olive Fell house courtesy of the Weiss family – the owners of the Four Bear Ranch at that time.

An excerpt from the article reads:

“Set within a basin adjoining the Shoshone National Forest, the ranch has art and literary ties that precede Bishop’s ownership. Printmaker, painter and sculptor Olive Fell once owned the property, which has a guesthouse named for the noted artist. Adding to its pedigree, author Ernest Hemingway purportedly visited the ranch on a number of occasions.”

la times

Four Bear Ranch is an exceptionally convenient, easily accessible but totally private wilderness retreat near one of Wyoming’s sought-after communities. The ranch has a complete and totally appropriate set of improvements sited in one of the most dramatically beautiful locations imaginable. Wyoming’s status as a tax haven with no state income and inheritance tax cannot be ignored as well. It should also be noted that there are no conservation easements on the ranch, nor are there any other easements through the ranch.

Randy Shelton Interviewed by “City Streets and Country Roads”

Hall and Hall Partner Randy Shelton was interviewed by “City Streets and Country Roads.” He discusses the ranch real estate market and Hall and Hall’s history at the 14:45 mark.

City Streets Country Roads – Real Estate from Community Seven Television on Vimeo.

Ideal Horse Properties For Sale

The historic Susie Q Ranch, located in the heart of south central Idaho’s unique high desert spring-fed Silver Creek ecosystem, is one of the great ranch properties in the prestigious Sun Valley area. Silver Creek, world renowned for its blue ribbon trout fishery, abundant wildlife and magnificent scenery, is protected in perpetuity by the nearby 900-acre Silver Creek Preserve and an additional 10,000 acres in conservation easements.

Susie Q Ranch

Susie Q Ranch

The South Mill Ranch consists of 1,224± deeded acres that occupies a substantial part  in its own valley protected by the San Cayetano Mountains which rise 2,000 feet above the ranch to 6,000 feet on the west. The 8,000 acre Sonoita Creek State Natural Area borders the ranch on the south, and natural geography including the Grosvenor Hills are on the east. The Santa Rita Mountains are just to the north, rising over 9,800 feet. The adobe style ranch improvements are impeccable and include a magnificent owner’s residence, an equally attractive but smaller guest house, a manager’s home and a stable complex.

South Mill Ranch

South Mill Ranch

The Rocking Four A Ranch consists of 1,027± acres bordering the Bitterroot National Forest, located on the coveted west side of the Bitterroot Valley. Offering a scenic redoubt among some the strongest wildlife populations in the west, the property provides immediate access to a full array of goods and services while providing privacy and seclusion. Located five minutes from historic Stevensville and 35 minutes from Missoula and its commercial air service, the Rocking Four A offers the best of both worlds – world-class western scenery and lifestyle in a location where modern conveniences and strong school districts are readily available. The property has outstanding hunting for elk, whitetail and turkey and supports a herd of around 150 head of cattle on a seasonal basis.

Rocking Four A

Rocking Four A

Lucky P Ranch sits on the shores of Lake Cypress Springs, just north of Winnsboro in Franklin County, Texas. Nearly 300 acres, the ranch offers a large hacienda-style home, equestrian facilities, abundant game, and the rolling timbered hills of East Texas. This is a family ranch, offering the unique recreational lifestyle of lake frontage and large acreage.

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Lucky P Ranch

Lost Peaks Ranch is surrounded by public lands 35 miles northeast of Sun Valley over Trail Creek Pass. Consisting of 731± deeded acres, the property sits at the base of 10,000-foot Jerry Peak adjacent to the recently designated Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness Area and offers panoramic views of the upper Lost River Valley and the massive Lost River Range, which encompasses the state’s highest peaks. – See more at: http://hallhall.com/ranches-for-sale/properties/lost-peaks-ranch-0?

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Lost Peaks Ranch

The Valley View Ranch consists of 2,339± acres located in Lake County, Montana, in the northern Mission Valley just south of Flathead Lake. With an estimated 550-acres of irrigated land, the property is estimated to support around 300 animal units on a seasonal basis. At the heart of the ranch are the Valley View Hills. With its 3,766-foot highpoint located within the ranch’s boundaries, the property is visible from many miles away and offers panoramic views of the Mission Mountains and Flathead Lake beyond.

Valley View Ranch

Valley View Ranch

Diversifying Ranch Income with Hunting

By: Tyler Jacobs

According to a recent article in Beef Magazine, CattleFax CEO Randy Blach states, “low calf prices are likely to remain in the $130 to $140 per cwt. range in 2017.” In other words, prices that cattle producers are likely to see in 2017 are very similar to what they are experiencing today.  What does that mean for ranchers? Now is the time to run a tight ship and make critical business decisions. For many, that may include diversifying a property’s income stream.

One form of income expansion would be to offer hunting opportunities. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation report, 13.7 million people aged 16 or older hunted that year and spent $38.3 billion on equipment, licenses, trips and more. This tells us that there is a strong desire for hunting opportunities in the U.S. and obviously landowners stand to benefit from that. Hunters not only stay in their home state (resident) but they also actively travel out of state (nonresident). This provides a rich pool of hunters to work with.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife – Hunting in America, An Economic Force for Conservation

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Hunters are also diversified in their interests, which can range from big game to upland game birds like bobwhite quail, chukar, turkey and pheasants. These are all species for which we, as land managers and wildlife biologists, can actively manage a property for. More often than not we are able to do so in balance with the overall goals of the farm or ranch. This is well illustrated in the book “Beef, Brush, and Bobwhites” by Hernandez and Guthrey. Livestock, agriculture and wildlife can function very well together. The King Ranch of south Texas is one of the best examples of this concept in action.

So what influences hunting prices? One might think it is a multi-million dollar lodge. Others would suggest it is food and amenities such as a swimming pool, wet bars and nice vehicles. However, the critical factor is the quality and quantity of wildlife present on a property. The majority of hunters partake in hunting for more than just the harvest. Outdoor recreationists cherish the opportunity to simply be a part of that environment. They appreciate the wildlife, the associated habitat and the opportunity to hunt.  A large percentage of hunters actually understand the investment in time, energy and finances that are made by landowners to ensure healthy wildlife populations that live in vigorous habitats. Hunters will remember the experiences from time spent in the field far more than the food or lodging.

quail hunting ranch georgia

The business side of hunting operations such as marketing hunts, making the land available for leasing, booking hunters, managing hunting camps, overseeing lessees, lease documents and working with the local state game biologists can be tedious to some. Many landowners simply choose to hire a service, such as that offered by Hall and Hall to manage their hunting operations. In this situation, the landowner knows that the ranch is faithfully represented and that the hunting operations will be professionally managed.

So what does all this mean for landowners, especially ranchers who may have to be tightening their belts due to low cattle prices? This is an opportunity to add income that had previously been left on the table and broaden the ranches income stream into the future. Selfishly, this gives us an opportunity to educate those who spend the majority of their time in urban environments about the importance of ranching and agriculture. Perhaps they will even celebrate their successful hunting experience with a steak. That works for all of us!.

Texas Farm & Ranch Wildlife Management: Qualified and Appraised Land

By: Justin Bryan

There is no question that the demographics of rural land ownership continues to change. Where we were once largely an agrarian society with each of us having some ties to a farm or ranch, it is no longer the case as more of us completely live an urban life. Yet the desire to own a farm or especially a beautiful ranch, is still very much in the minds of most of us.

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For many new ranch owners, they desire the property but prefer to avoid the ownership of their own livestock herd and/or coping with grazing leases. It’s not that they don’t understand the value of livestock, they just choose not to oversee the issues involved with livestock. Instead their goals tend to revolve around increasing the abundance and health of native vegetation, being able to view a diversity of wildlife, and reinvigorating riparian/stream and fishery ecosystems. In other words, their primary use of the land is managing it for wild things.

LAND VALUATION

Historically in Texas, appraisal districts and appraised land operating with a livestock business qualify for a tax rate lower than other properties. These are known as 1-d-1 appraisals. A 1-d-1 valuation rate was not in place for those ranch owners who possessed little interest in livestock yet valued and actively invested time, money and labor into the enhancement of rangelands, forests, deserts, wetlands, wildlife, and fisheries.

Understanding that the demographics of rural land ownership in Texas was and is changing, and more importantly to support the continued landowner efforts to ecologically care for these properties, the Texas voters approved Proposition 11 in 1995. This amended 1-d-1 of the Texas Constitution thus: “to permit productivity appraisal for land used to manage wildlife.”  This was followed by House Bill 1358, “adding wildlife management as an agricultural use that qualifies the land for agricultural (productivity) appraisal.” At that point, if the primary use of the land is managing for wildlife, the land could potentially qualify for the 1-d-1 valuation rate. The passage of Proposition 11 opened the doors for landowners to maintain the 1-d-1 valuation rate by actively managing for wildlife and without the responsibility of livestock.

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REQUIREMENTS TO QUALIFY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT USE  

  1. The land must have been qualified and appraised as 1-d-1 agricultural land in the year prior to conversion to wildlife management use.
  2. Land must be used to generate a sustaining breeding, migrating or wintering population of indigenous wild animals.
  3. The indigenous wildlife populations must be produced for human use.

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APPLICATION TO QUALIFY FOR WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT USE

  1. The landowner must submit a wildlife management plan to the chief tax appraiser in the county between January 1 and April 30 of the tax year.
  2. The landowner must perform 3 of the 7 management practices each year.
    1. Habitat Control (Management)
    2. Erosion Control
    3. Predator Control (Management)
    4. Providing Supplemental Supplies of Water
    5. Providing Supplemental Supplies of Food
    6. Providing Shelter
    7. Making Census Counts to Determine Population

For more detailed information or assistance with the agricultural tax valuation for wildlife use, feel free to contact us at Hall and Hall Farm and Ranch Management Services: Justin Bryan ([email protected]).

Additional information regarding the wildlife valuation can be found at: http://comptroller.texas.gov/taxinfo/proptax/pdf/96-354.pdf or http://forages.tamu.edu/PDF/Wildlife%20Management%20as%20Agricultural%20Use%20for%20Property%20Tax%20Valuation%20in%20Texas.pdf

 

York Lodge at Delta Marsh: Top Duck Hunting Property in Canada

The 50,000-acre Delta Marsh is an extensive open marsh located along the south shore of Lake Manitoba 60 miles west of Winnipeg that provides critical breeding and staging habitat for numerous migratory bird species. In waterfowl circles, Delta Marsh is among the most storied hunting destinations in North America and renown for its large concentrations of canvasback ducks which stage in the marsh each fall.

Beginning this month, waterfowl hunters from around the world make a pilgrimage to Delta Marsh in search of “cans”  and other sought after diving and puddle ducks such as redheads, bluebills, ringnecks, mallards, pintails, and teal.   Much of the marsh is managed by the Province of Manitoba as part of the Delta Marsh Wildlife Management Area, although there are scattered private holdings within the marsh.

Hall and Hall is honored to offer for the sale the largest of these private tracts referred to as York Lodge at Delta Marsh, which consists of 3,600+/- acres and 8+/- of shoreline along Lake Manitoba.  Combining marsh, open water, and beachfront, this diverse property was originally purchased in the 1920s by James Ford Bell, founder of General Mills, who was drawn to Delta Marsh because of its epic canvasback hunting.  A series of water controlled management areas have been developed within the property and can be managed to attract an impressive number of dabbling ducks, while points, channels, and open water bays offer classic diver hunting.  The property’s forested lake shore separates Delta Marsh from Lake Manitoba and provides excellent whitetail hunting.