Springtime in the Rockies

By: Cody Lujan

Spring is perhaps one of the best times of the year to view wildlife on Colorado mountain ranches and retreats. While the closing of ski area lifts and the receding of snow brings a short window of calm and quiet to communities throughout the Rockies, the region’s wildlife is awake and on the move.  The warming and greening of valleys and mountain slopes brings an influx of animals migrating to spring and summer grounds as well as the awakening of hibernating denizens.

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Elk, mule deer, bighorn sheep, and pronghorn are migrating back to their calving grounds and seemingly following the snow line as it draws higher into the backcountry. These animals are active throughout the day during this time of year and can be found grazing and browsing in the open. Similarly, the raptor, song bird, and water fowl migration is in full swing with birds arriving daily.

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Along with the opportunity to see a ranch without snow or tall grass covering the ground, spring affords the opportunity to enjoy the spring turkey “rut”.

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If you’re looking for a quiet time of the year to get a good of lay of the land as well as to check out the wildlife on a specific property, springtime can often be the best time.

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Montana Trout Fishing Season is Looking GOOD!

To quote Explore Big Sky columnist Patrick Straub, “Reports are trickling in, chatter is growing louder in the corners of local fly shops, and pullouts are being used more by anglers than for excess snow. Don’t put your skis or boards away yet—some of the best snow of the season will soon fall on the slopes. But if you take your recreation seriously, have your waders and rod at the ready at all times because we are in the season of potential.”

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Some parts of Montana received record-breaking snowfall in February, resulting in well-above-normal snowpack totals for March 1 for most river basins, according to snow survey data collected by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Twenty-five SNOTEL stations and manual measurement locations set new records for February totals, and 21 measurements at other locations were the second highest on record. Long story short, spring fishing should be great and late summer and fall fishing should remain strong.

If you are in the market to buy a Montana Fly Fishing Ranch, here are some great options.

IX Ranch Featured in December 2017 Issue of Western Horseman

We were thrilled with the feature story in the December 2017 issue of Western Horseman profiling IX Ranch.  The IX Ranch is a legacy ranch – it is huge, has a long history of stable ownership and a respected reputation in reputation ranch country.  Its central Montana location is 80 miles northeast of Great Falls and adjacent to the town of Big Sandy. The current owners are the second owners in the ranch’s 128-year history. To read the full story, click the image below.

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This professionally managed operation runs a cattle herd of 4,300. They currently winter around 3,375 bred females, 120 3-year-and-younger bulls and ranch horses, together with 4,000 tons of winter feed. In the spring, around 650 of the previous years’ heifer calves will return to the ranch for breeding from a grow-lot near Billings. The operation covers over 126,000± acres, of which 59,809± is deeded and the majority of the balance being State grazing leases. To view the official listing, click here.

Texas Farm & Ranch Auction Totals $24 Million+

Over 150 bidders attended the 11,831 acre Texas Farm and Ranch Auction on November 14th in Athens, TX.  Seven of the 45 registered bidders prevailed in a spirited competition for 16 tracts.  The auction totaled $24,034,970.  Negotiations are proceeding on remaining parcels.

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Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Lone Star Land Steward Awards

By: Justin Bryan

As a wildlife biologist, I’m always interested in properties (ranches, farms, plantations) that utilize management practices such as restoring rangelands, better farming techniques, brush management, improving watersheds, etc. It requires thinking, big planning, financial considerations, and a lot of physical labor. More often than not, the largest challenge is committing to doing things differently from how they’ve always been done.

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Our Hall and Hall Farm and Ranch services team is often engaged to help landowners with such tasks. Bringing in new ideas, with years of experience to support them. Our in-the-field knowledge and staff diversity lend itself well to working with a farm or ranch owner to create a plan of action and see it through. Fortunately, we are able to work with landowners throughout the U.S. and are not geographically challenged. Living in Texas, I try to keep up with the success that all landowners are having when they undertake such endeavors.

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In a state such as Texas that is 97% privately owned, residents rely on private property owners to manage for healthy ecosystems on a diversity of environments. From the piney woods of east Texas to the deserts of west Texas and from the coastal riparian areas to the high plains. The habitats on these farms and ranches are important for items such as clean air, minimizing soil erosion, allow water to filter into the aquifers, acting as a buffer for hurricanes and providing a home to a diversity of plant life, insects, endangered species, common wildlife, etc.

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Since 1996, The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has annually awarded a Lone Star Land Steward Award to landowners in each ecoregion of Texas, who go above and beyond in an effort to manage the natural resources on their property. Below are the 2017 award winners with a brief description of each management program.

Blackland Prairie – Brown Ranch, Fayette County

Mark Brown, owner

  • When the Brown family acquired their ranch in 2000, the property had been heavily utilized for hay production, livestock grazing and row crop farming which left the habitat quality in poor condition and nearly 100% covered in exotic grasses.
  • The Browns began restoring their piece of the vanishing Fayette Prairie back to a tall grass community for the benefit of grassland songbirds and pollinator species. Mr. Brown has utilized a number of innovative techniques to control exotic grasses.
  • Mr. Brown has cooperated with a number of different partners to complete multiple GRIP and EQIP grassland restoration projects.
  • Brown is an active member of a number of conservation organizations and sits on the board of the East Navidad Wildlife Management Association and the South Central Texas Prescribed Burn Association.
  • The family frequently hosts field days on the ranch to share what they have learned with their neighbors.

Edwards Plateau – Three Mile Creek Ranch, Gillespie County

Kim Bergman and Pam Mabry Bergman, owners

  • When purchased in 1996, the 685-acre hill country property was covered in dense ashe juniper (cedar) trees. The Bergman’s began asking the advice from natural resource professionals and quickly developed a plan.
  • The Bergmans selectively hand cut cedar on 500 acres and hand seeded the cleared areas with native grasses.
  • The thick grasses that developed due to the juniper clearing have increased groundwater recharge, improved stream flow/water quality in the creek and improved soil health.
  • They utilize all five of Aldo Leopold’s famous tools for habitat management and income production to restore the landscape.
  • The Texas Youth Hunting Program has been utilized to help control white-tailed deer numbers, and wildlife management classes from Tarleton State University come to the ranch several times per year to learn wildlife, watershed and land management techniques.
  • As a confirmation of their long term stewardship goals, the Bergmans donated a 685 acre conservation easement on the ranch to insure the land will remain natural and intact forever.

Cross Timbers & Prairies – Solana Ranch, Bell & Williamson Counties

Michaux Family, owners

  • Property acquired in 1950 by Frank Michaux has been managed by the Michaux family for close to 67 years.
  • Through the years, the ranch has selectively cleared ashe juniper and applied prescribed fire to restore productive grassland habitats and protect valuable springs and water resources.
  • The Solana’s unique hunting operation provides fantastic dove hunting access for many local hunters, which in turn allows the family to derive sustainable income to manage other aspects of ranch operations.
  • The family partnered with The Nature Conservancy to place a conservation easement on 250 acres of important habitat to protect the Salado salamander.
  • The ranch serves as a trap site for TPWD’s statewide turkey and dove banding studies.
  • Through their innovative cattle and hunting operations, they have found a way to hold a special piece of property together in the face of development pressure.

Pineywoods – Arcadia, Shelby County

Greg Grant, owner

  • Greg Grant lives on his great-grandparent’s longtime farm in Arcadia, Texas where he continues to persistently restore parcels of native habitat for the benefit of wildlife and the education of his fellow landowners.
  • From 1953–1993, Grant’s grandfather farmed, produced hay and raised beef cattle and horses on the place. When Greg took ownership, he began to reforest portions of the property and plant some parts in native prairie.
  • Greg’s primary wildlife goal is to create habitat for native cavity-nesting birds, pine savanna birds and a number of pollinator species. His fire-maintained, snag-filled pine forest has attracted seven of the eight species of East Texas woodpeckers plus eastern bluebirds, pine warblers, brown-headed nuthatches and numerous other songbirds.
  • Perhaps closest to his heart is a remnant population of prairie trillium that he discovered growing in his hardwood forest. This rare species was previously unknown in Texas and is now found in only two other locations in East Texas.
  • In addition to restoring his great-grandparent’s 1890’s dogtrot style farmhouse, Grant also cooperated with the Stephen F. Austin State University Center of Regional Heritage Research as the pilot community for their Voices from Small Places project.
  • Over the last 20 years, Greg has hosted hundreds of visitors for educational and recreational tours of the property. He is a shining example of what true land stewardship and rural family heritage looks like on an averaged sized east Texas tract of land.

South Texas – Harris Ranch, Uvalde and Kinney Counties

Mike Harris, owner

John Sewell, manager

  • The Harris Ranch, which has approximately 6.5 miles of the West Nueces River flowing through its boundaries, had been severely overgrazed with resulting poor land and water quality when John Sewell took over management of the property. Cattle were immediately deferred while the ranch began to recover.
  • Sewell worked with NRCS to fence off over 800 acres of riparian habitat along the river in order to allow the area to capture sediment, revegetate, slow down flood water and increase water quality. Recent flood events have proven this work to be extremely valuable, not only for the local wildlife but also for landowners and water users downstream.
  • The ranch has an active brush management program where juniper, mesquite, and prickly pear are controlled.
  • The ranch is an active participant in TPWD’s Managed Lands Deer Program (MLDP) and maintains an active hunting component to ranch operations. Although deer hunting pays most of the bills, turkeys have responded very well to the habitat management on the ranch and have gone from nearly nonexistent populations at the time of Sewell’s arrival to robust and growing numbers today.
  • John Sewell and the Harris Ranch maintain an open door policy to government and university staff for landowner workshops and research projects. They also provide opportunities for kids to learn about the outdoors and hunting through youth hunts with a number of organizations.

Trans-Pecos – El Carmen Land & Conservation Co., LLC, Brewster County

CEMEX USA and J. Austin Ranches, owners

Billy Pat and Bonnie McKinney, managers

  • When CEMEX USA and J. Austin Ranches purchased the property in 2006 the land was suffering from severe erosion and overgrazing by domestic livestock and exotic species. However, they knew that because of the strategic location of the property it was crucial to the long-term health of Trans-Pecos wildlife.
  • A perpetual conservation easement was placed on 9,496 deeded acres adjacent to and south of Black Gap Wildlife Management Area along the Rio Grande.
  • From inception the mission statement of ECLCC has been “To restore the lands and native wildlife of a lower desert ecosystem, and protect vital dispersal corridors for wildlife and birds on a local and transboundary level, with the long-term goal of having the area serve as a demonstration and research property that can eventually be used as a model for lower Chihuahuan Desert Conservation.”
  • The property serves as an important travel corridor for black bear and desert bighorn sheep.
  • Sources of water were scarce when the property was acquired, but today a total of 37 permanent water sources are now available to wildlife on the ranch.
  • The ranch has cooperated with government partners on a number of translocation projects where native wildlife species including mule deer, Gambel’s quail, and Rio Grande Silvery Minnows were reintroduced on the ranch. One such project was the four-year partnership with TPWD to relocate Gambel’s quail to their historic range. To date the birds have done very well dispersing along the Rio Grande corridor and showing good reproduction each year.

Rolling Plains – Wild Wings Ranch, Scurry County

Rod and Mary Hench, owners

  • When Rod and Mary Hench acquired the Wild Wings Ranch it had been severely overgrazed and was covered with prickly pear, mesquite, and red berry juniper.
  • The Henches developed an innovative block management approach across the entire ranch where 25 percent of each acreage block is treated each year according to a color-coded grid. Nearly every acre of the ranch has been treated to control invasive plants and optimize wildlife habitat.
  • They also protect valuable spring systems on the ranch with strategic mechanical brush control. They catch runoff water and prevent erosion by developing small spreader dams seeded with native grasses after construction.
  • They provide for future turkey roost sites by controlling brush in riparian (creek) areas and planting cottonwood trees to improve riparian habitat. Artificial turkey roosts have also been constructed to provide winter roosting habitat.
  • Stocker cattle are utilized during the dormant season to improve coverage and diversity of warm-season grasses and forbs, which are highly valuable for native wildlife.
  • Rod and Mary regularly work with natural resource agencies to host landowner field days on the ranch. They also open their gates to universities for student field training and wildlife research.

Visit to Historic Encampment, Wyoming and Half Diamond Horseshoe Ranch

By: Mike Fraley

This summer my family rode along with me to Encampment, Wyoming on the slopes of the Sierra Madre Mountains where the beautiful Half Diamond Horseshoe Ranch is located.  We thoroughly enjoyed our time spent in the Saratoga and Encampment area where we visited Saratoga’s Hot Springs, had several great meals and drove through beautiful country.  Being a family of history buffs, one of the best highlights was discovering the rich history of the town that was once known as “Grand Encampment”.

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This area was first discovered by French-Canadian trappers and traders who held rendezvous in the 1830’s at a place they named “Camp le Grand”.  Tribes of Ute, Shoshone, Crow, Arapaho, Cheyenne and Sioux Indians regularly traveled through and hunted the Sierra Madres.  Later, around the 1840’s, a portion of the Cherokee Trail was used by gold-seekers looking for fortune in California.  Lumbering, the Union Pacific Railroad and cattle ranching began bringing settlers to the town of Encampment in the 1860’s and 1870’s. Then thousand head of cattle were reported in the area by the mid-1880’s, utilizing the Cherokee Trail as they trailed into this part of the Wyoming Territory.

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It was copper discovered in the mountains above this quiet settlement that put Encampment on the map and showed promise that the town had the potential of becoming a western industrial stronghold.  Copper was first discovered by George Doane near Battle Lake in the Sierra Madres in the late 1880’s, and sheepherder Ed Haggarty found a vein in 1897 that created a decade-long boom in the area.  Later the Boston & Wyoming Smelter, Power and Light Company began mining in Encampment and created a 16-mile-long aerial tramway to transport ore from the mountains to the smelter.  This tramway was the longest in the world at the time and was considered an engineering marvel as it carried 840 buckets of ore that held as much as 700 pounds each.  In August of 1908, the Saratoga and Encampment Railway reached Encampment from the main Union Pacific line.  This would have been very advantageous as it was the “Only Line to the Great Wyoming Copper Mining District”; however it came too late as copper prices had taken a drastic hit and a series of fires at the smelter caused many of the reported 2,000 residents of Encampment to pack up and leave.  The boom that the mines brought to the area was large enough to “somewhat damage” the state’s entire economy when things went bust.

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In the decades that have followed the area has been sustained by agriculture, mainly cattle and hay production. The John E. Rouse Beef Improvement Center is run by Colorado State University as a research facility to study and improve genetics in cattle that are raised in high elevations.    Saratoga and Encampment are also known for beautiful guest ranches and excellent fishing along the Platte River.  Logging continues to have a strong presence in Encampment as well.  Two of the town’s sources of pride are the Grand Encampment Museum, which was named by Wyoming Travel and Tourism in 2011 as its “Attraction of the Year”, and the renovated Grand Encampment Opera House which has hosted over one hundred years of melodramas that are still enjoyed at least twice a year in Encampment.

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Discovering hidden treasures like the town of Encampment with its rich history and the beauty of the Sierra Madres is one of the many perks that I enjoy as I look at ranch property from one end of the state to the other.