Four Bear Ranch Profiled by LA Times

Four Bear Ranch, a 1,246-acre Cody, Wyoming mountain retreat and hunting property once home to “Gunsmoke” writer Ron Bishop, was recently profiled by The Los Angeles Times. While the article incorrectly states that Bishop owned the ranch, he did live in the Olive Fell house courtesy of the Weiss family – the owners of the Four Bear Ranch at that time.

An excerpt from the article reads:

“Set within a basin adjoining the Shoshone National Forest, the ranch has art and literary ties that precede Bishop’s ownership. Printmaker, painter and sculptor Olive Fell once owned the property, which has a guesthouse named for the noted artist. Adding to its pedigree, author Ernest Hemingway purportedly visited the ranch on a number of occasions.”

la times

Four Bear Ranch is an exceptionally convenient, easily accessible but totally private wilderness retreat near one of Wyoming’s sought-after communities. The ranch has a complete and totally appropriate set of improvements sited in one of the most dramatically beautiful locations imaginable. Wyoming’s status as a tax haven with no state income and inheritance tax cannot be ignored as well. It should also be noted that there are no conservation easements on the ranch, nor are there any other easements through the ranch.

Randy Shelton Interviewed by “City Streets and Country Roads”

Hall and Hall Partner Randy Shelton was interviewed by “City Streets and Country Roads.” He discusses the ranch real estate market and Hall and Hall’s history at the 14:45 mark.

City Streets Country Roads – Real Estate from Community Seven Television on Vimeo.

2016 Southeastern Land Sales

In 2016, we sold 11 southeastern properties totaling 16,000 acres. Each property presented unique challenges requiring an intimate knowledge of the land, as well as our client’s individual goals. We are grateful for the opportunities to work on these diverse landscapes throughout the South.

Hall and Hall Brokers Sale of Blue Springs Plantation

Hall and Hall’s Southeastern Affiliate, Elliott Davenport, recently brokered the sale of Blue Springs Plantation. The historic 7,235 acre property near Albany, GA had not changed hands in 50+ years and includes some of the most productive wild quail hunting ground in all of South Georgia.

Blue Springs Plantation Hunt (2)

Surrounded by neighbors that include Nonami, Pineland and Wildfair Plantations, Blue Springs is trophy recreational land that provides excellent whitetail deer and turkey hunting, in addition to its quail opportunities. The plantation has miles of frontage on the Flint River – an ecologically important and spectacular free flowing river.

Blue Springs Plantation Hunt (3)

The main house is a quintessential southern plantation home that was first built in the early 1930s by William C. Potter, following a design by Hentz, Adler & Shutze of Atlanta, Georgia. Edward Vason Jones was commissioned to design a wing for the gun room, wine cellar and library in 1957.

Blue Springs Plantation Edited

For more information on the sale, contact Elliott Davenport at 423-364-2092.

Diversifying Ranch Income with Hunting

By: Tyler Jacobs

According to a recent article in Beef Magazine, CattleFax CEO Randy Blach states, “low calf prices are likely to remain in the $130 to $140 per cwt. range in 2017.” In other words, prices that cattle producers are likely to see in 2017 are very similar to what they are experiencing today.  What does that mean for ranchers? Now is the time to run a tight ship and make critical business decisions. For many, that may include diversifying a property’s income stream.

One form of income expansion would be to offer hunting opportunities. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation report, 13.7 million people aged 16 or older hunted that year and spent $38.3 billion on equipment, licenses, trips and more. This tells us that there is a strong desire for hunting opportunities in the U.S. and obviously landowners stand to benefit from that. Hunters not only stay in their home state (resident) but they also actively travel out of state (nonresident). This provides a rich pool of hunters to work with.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife – Hunting in America, An Economic Force for Conservation

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Hunters are also diversified in their interests, which can range from big game to upland game birds like bobwhite quail, chukar, turkey and pheasants. These are all species for which we, as land managers and wildlife biologists, can actively manage a property for. More often than not we are able to do so in balance with the overall goals of the farm or ranch. This is well illustrated in the book “Beef, Brush, and Bobwhites” by Hernandez and Guthrey. Livestock, agriculture and wildlife can function very well together. The King Ranch of south Texas is one of the best examples of this concept in action.

So what influences hunting prices? One might think it is a multi-million dollar lodge. Others would suggest it is food and amenities such as a swimming pool, wet bars and nice vehicles. However, the critical factor is the quality and quantity of wildlife present on a property. The majority of hunters partake in hunting for more than just the harvest. Outdoor recreationists cherish the opportunity to simply be a part of that environment. They appreciate the wildlife, the associated habitat and the opportunity to hunt.  A large percentage of hunters actually understand the investment in time, energy and finances that are made by landowners to ensure healthy wildlife populations that live in vigorous habitats. Hunters will remember the experiences from time spent in the field far more than the food or lodging.

quail hunting ranch georgia

The business side of hunting operations such as marketing hunts, making the land available for leasing, booking hunters, managing hunting camps, overseeing lessees, lease documents and working with the local state game biologists can be tedious to some. Many landowners simply choose to hire a service, such as that offered by Hall and Hall to manage their hunting operations. In this situation, the landowner knows that the ranch is faithfully represented and that the hunting operations will be professionally managed.

So what does all this mean for landowners, especially ranchers who may have to be tightening their belts due to low cattle prices? This is an opportunity to add income that had previously been left on the table and broaden the ranches income stream into the future. Selfishly, this gives us an opportunity to educate those who spend the majority of their time in urban environments about the importance of ranching and agriculture. Perhaps they will even celebrate their successful hunting experience with a steak. That works for all of us!.

Yaggy Plantation Sells to Television Producer at Auction

On October 5th, American TV executive Craig Piligian and his actress/dancer wife Lucinda Piligian purchased the historic Reno County, Kansas Yaggy Plantation at auction for $5.325 million. Piligian is the President and CEO of Pilgrim Films & Television and best known for creating The Ultimate Fighter, American Chopper and Dirty Jobs series for Discovery Channel. In 2001, he won an Emmy Award as co-Executive Producer of Survivor.

The 1,260-acre property was once the largest shipping point for fruit between the Missouri River and California. In fact, at one time it had as many as 50,000 apple trees and a million catalpa trees – which were sold for fence posts and railroad ties.

The two homes, which are accessed from a quarter-mile tree-lined drive, still reflect the period. The south home was built first, in 1892, as a manufactured Sears and Roebuck home that was shipped in by rail. The north house, built around 1905, has a similar floor plan, with five bedrooms. The home was refurbished in 2005.

“There were 100+ in attendance and 25 registered bidders,” said Scott Shuman of Hall and Hall Auctions.  ”There was constant and lively bidding on a variety of tracts and combinations, yet the property sold to a single bidder.

To read the full story of the sale click here.

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