Hall and Hall Auctions Does More Than Sell Real Estate

By: Rob Hart

As popular as Farm and Ranch auctions have been around the country, live auctions have been a mainstay at charity events for years and years. As with any hard to value asset, charity managers have known donations sell best via auction. Hall and Hall loves to give back and contribute to as many great causes as possible.  Here is a list of some of our favorite charity events that we work and support.

  • The National Western Stock Show’s Junior Livestock Auction: Considered by many to be the National Championship of the livestock showing circuit, the Junior Sale is an opportunity for the best and brightest of our youth to show off their agricultural expertise and raise hundreds of thousands of dollars in educational donations.

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  • Weld County Junior Livestock Sale: Where the top 245 animals from the county are sold to support youth education, FFA, 4-H, and the local food bank.
  • RamStrength Lubick Foundation: When cancer victims are not in the position to both fight the fight and manage day to day financial responsibilities, look no further than RamStrenght; the only local charity providing financial assistance for all types of cancer survivors in Northern Colorado.
  • Colorado State Volleyball: Even at the best universities, it’s not possible to fund every sport to the necessary level without community support.  The Season Banquet has become one of the great opportunities for Ram Volleyball fans to give back and support the volleyball team.
  • UCHealth Poudre Valley Hospital and Medical Center of the Rockies: The Spring Benefit is one of the biggest live auction events in Northern Colorado. Raising hundreds of thousands of dollars each spring to help the less fortunate better manage medical expenses.
  • St. Jude Evening of Hope: The signature fundraising event in Denver, Colorado, supporting the lifesaving mission of the Children’s Research Hospital. St. Jude Rare Whiskey Auction: Another great event to both add to your high-end liquor collection, and raise money for Children’s Medical Research. St. Jude Annual Toy Auction:  Each year auctioneers from around the country descend on the hospital to perform the National Auctioneers Association’s annual toy auction.  Millions have been raised over the years and every child goes home with a toy.
  • Pearl Harbor’s Pacific Aviation Museum Gala Fundraiser: Developing and maintaining an internationally recognized aviation museum that educates the young and honors the aviators that defend our freedom.

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We donate our time and expertise to these great charities for various personal reasons.  However, there are many more which deserve time, money and attention. We encourage everyone to pick a great organization that means something to you and support it to the maximum of your ability.

 

 

 

CNBC: Boone Pickens puts $250 million ranch up for sale

Mesa Vista Ranch comprises over 100 square miles of prime Eastern Texas Panhandle ranch land and represents almost 50 years of Boone Pickens’ assemblage, improvement, and devotion.  For more information, contact Monte Lyons at 806-438-0582.

Boone Pickens puts $250 million ranch up for sale from CNBC.

The Value of Having Wealth “Tied to the Land”

By: Tyler Jacobs

What does it mean to be “tied to the land”?

Once you have sold farms and ranches for 20 years and enjoyed much of the same lifestyle yourself, there are certain observations and conclusions that are easy to come by. Our past and current clients are all “tied to the land” in some way, whether it is by their hard work or by their investment in the land.

One of my favorite men of the past generation is Will Rogers, and I think he put it best when he said, “What the country needs is dirtier fingernails and cleaner minds.” The virtues of dirty fingernails generally apply to those that are responsible for the production or care of something else.

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For most people, owning farm and ranchland involves them as a steward and caretaker. Your tree fell on the neighbor’s fence, so someone needs to know how to run the chainsaw. When it’s time to ship the calves, somebody must be responsible for the cut gate. Somebody is prepared to help that first-calf heifer. Somebody will have to clean up the turn row and fill the planter. Sounds like pretty simple stuff, but the virtues of the knowledge, problem-solving skills, and appreciation from tending to farm or ranch land are in high demand.

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These skills can be exponentially leveraged in life decisions outside of land stewardship or agrarian economies. I have a friend and a client that was required by his parents to graduate with an agriculture production degree, further his education with an MBA, and do post-graduate work in ranch management before he could go to into the family business of investment banking. Firm handshakes, hard work, reaping what you sow, and living with failure are certainly virtues better taught on the family ranch than at Harvard.

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I am grateful to have my kids “tied to the land” and learn these valuable lessons, as I know they will serve them well, whether it is on the ranch or in the boardroom. Accordingly, one of the ideas we promote significantly within the partnership is the terminology of “Investment Quality Rural Real Estate”, or the simple idea that placing or leveraging wealth into farm and ranch land can serve as an investment vehicle.

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Will Rogers also used to say, “Don’t wait to buy land, buy land and wait.” Many of our clients are motivated to build a legacy for the next generation through the purchase of a farm or ranch that is less “liquid” of an asset than other investments. Patience, land improvement, long-term appreciation, and the cyclical nature of real estate all serve to educate the next generation’s investment principles. Having wealth “tied to the land” brings mature balance to a youthful worldview that is accustomed to instant gratification.

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IX Ranch Featured in December 2017 Issue of Western Horseman

We were thrilled with the feature story in the December 2017 issue of Western Horseman profiling IX Ranch.  The IX Ranch is a legacy ranch – it is huge, has a long history of stable ownership and a respected reputation in reputation ranch country.  Its central Montana location is 80 miles northeast of Great Falls and adjacent to the town of Big Sandy. The current owners are the second owners in the ranch’s 128-year history. To read the full story, click the image below.

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This professionally managed operation runs a cattle herd of 4,300. They currently winter around 3,375 bred females, 120 3-year-and-younger bulls and ranch horses, together with 4,000 tons of winter feed. In the spring, around 650 of the previous years’ heifer calves will return to the ranch for breeding from a grow-lot near Billings. The operation covers over 126,000± acres, of which 59,809± is deeded and the majority of the balance being State grazing leases. To view the official listing, click here.

Collaboration thrives at Rock Creek Ranch

Rock Creek Ranch embraces 10,400 acres of land in a series of succulent meadows surrounded by miles upon miles of good-quality rangeland below the shadow of the Smoky Mountains in Blaine County.

The ranch is home to sage grouse, a species of concern, as well as moose, elk, deer, antelope and other critters.

Because of its dual qualities as a working ranch with strong conservation values, Rock Creek Ranch was purchased recently from the Rinker Family by the Wood River Land Trust and The Nature Conservancy in a unique partnership with the University of Idaho. The deal was brokered by Trent Jones of Hall and Hall.  Read the full story here.

Where are all the Quail in Texas?

The Reversing the Quail Decline Initiative is a joint effort between Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department which provides resources for quail conservation in the state of Texas. Their monthly newsletter includes links to educational materials, news articles, information on upcoming events, and invitations to quail-relevant classes and programs. Here is a recent article.

As we head into 2018, it’s time to reflect on the 2017 Texas Quail Index monitoring efforts. Cooperators from counties all over Texas evaluate quail populations and resources in their area by conducting call counts, setting up dummy nests, catching images of predators using game cameras, scoring habitat, and counting quail along the roadsides. This new Wild Wonderings article summarizes the data we’ve collected.

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One question we’re suddenly hearing a lot over the past few months is: “Where did they all go?!” Many folks have commented that they saw plenty of quail over the summer, but the birds seem to have disappeared over the fall and winter. Hunting reports have been mixed as well, with some having decent luck and others feeling frustrated with this year’s crop compared to the exceptional seasons of 2016 and 2015. There are also a lot of hunters reporting suspiciously low juvenile to adult (J:A) ratios, which may indicate that chick production or survival were not as high this year as we might have hoped.

The J:A ratio is something you can monitor yourself if you go out during hunting season. By looking at a set of feathers called the primary coverts (pictured below), you can easily determine whether you have a juvenile or adult bird. See this helpful video for more information. As a general rule of thumb, the more juveniles you have, the better shape the population is in.

To answer the question of “where did they all go?,” we will have to wait and see. Weather may have been partially responsible for low numbers during roadside counts in the fall months, as several areas received rain that made getting around and observing birds difficult. On some properties, the birds might still be present but lying low (there are several TQI cooperators who consistently get skunked on their roadside counts, although other metrics indicate that there are quail there). There are also reports of high numbers of eye worm parasites this year which may be a contributing factor, especially in the Rolling Plains ecoregion where the worms are most prevalent. The low J:A ratios are also concerning, but it remains to be seen what impact all of this will ultimately have on quail in 2018.

It’s important to remember that quail populations follow a “boom and bust” pattern and that a dip in the numbers isn’t necessarily concerning. What we’re trying to address in the Reversing the Quail Decline Initiative is the long-term trend of declining quail numbers.

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