Buckhorn Mountain Ranch

Property Map

Buckhorn Mountain Ranch

$29,975,000
Montrose, Colorado

Just 14 miles south of Montrose, Colorado, the Buckhorn Mountain Ranch spreads across 6,573.41± deeded acres and 6,003± leased BLM acres of stunningly beautiful irrigated farm land and high desert country at the base of Storm King Peak. Located in Montrose and Ouray Counties off U.S. Highway 550, the ranch is adjacent to Buckhorn Lakes Park, a popular recreational area owned by the city of Montrose, and has magnificent views of the San Juan Mountains 20 miles to the south.

This exceptional property is both a working cattle ranch with a full complement of livestock facilities and a superb hunting retreat with excellent habitat for mule deer and elk. The current owner of Buckhorn Mountain Ranch runs about 300 animal units and raises and sells AQHA horses. Ranching facilities include corrals, a 20,000-pound scale, a riding arena and horse paddock, a calving shed, maintenance buildings, and staff housing. There are 400± acres of irrigated pastures and hay meadows, as well as a three-acre organic garden with greenhouses and irrigation.

Locals call Storm King Peak “Buckhorn Mountain” for all the mule deer and elk that live, range, and shed their antlers here. Likewise, its namesake ranch has a well-earned reputation for trophy-size mule deer and large elk. The property, located in Colorado Game Management Unit 65, has been professionally managed for guided hunts. Accommodations for hunters include a bunkhouse and two cabins.

The ranch also has two lovely custom-built homes, in addition to guest facilities and staff housing. The two-story owner’s home has 3,290± square feet, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, two wood-burning fireplaces, and a separate studio apartment. The manager’s home has 6 bedrooms and 4.5 baths in 3,278± square feet and a separate 1,023± detached apartment.

And while the Buckhorn Mountain Ranch offers privacy and seclusion, it is also conveniently close to some of southwestern Colorado’s favorite winter recreational venues and towns, including Ridgway, Ouray, and the ski slopes at Telluride.

Co-listed with Lone Eagle Land Brokerage, Inc.

Location: 

Buckhorn Mountain Ranch is located east of U.S. Highway 550 almost midway between Montrose and Ridgway near Colona, Colorado (Pop. 30). Buckhorn Road, a paved county road, leads from U.S. Highway 550 to the ranch and provides easy year-round access.

The ranch spreads across Montrose and Ouray counties and is surrounded largely by BLM lands and private property. Buckhorn Lakes Park, a popular recreational area owned by the city of Montrose, borders the ranch on the southeast.

Montrose (Pop. 19,123) offers excellent shopping, dining, and health care just 14 miles north of the ranch, while the quaint and artsy Ridgway (Pop. 932) is 19 miles south.

AIRPORTS
Major carriers provide daily nonstop flights from the Montrose Regional Airport to Denver and other western and southern cities, depending upon the season.

The Telluride Regional Airport serves general aviation flights and has a single, jet-capable runway.

Locale: 

Montrose County (pop. 40,713) runs roughly from the western slope of the San Juan Mountains to the Utah border across a geologic transition zone between the mountains and desert. Ouray County (pop. 4,557) claims the gateway to the San Juans. Buckhorn Mountain Ranch straddles the divide between these two counties atop the Cimarron Ridge east of the Uncompahgre River Valley.

The San Juan Mountains are famous for their rugged peaks, steep canyons, and deep river valleys. Southwestern Colorado is also home to thirteen peaks above 14,000 feet above sea level, known by climbers as “Fourteeners.” This region also claims the headwaters of the famous Rio Grande, San Miguel, and Dolores rivers.

Much of Colorado’s mining history was written here with famous gold strikes at the Idarado, Camp Bird, and Smuggler Union mines. The 19th century mining towns of Telluride, Ouray, Durango, and Silverton have been reborn as vibrant centers for art, music, and tourism. Winter sports, including skiing at Telluride 58 miles south of the ranch, and ice-climbing in Ouray, are major engines for the local economy.

General Description: 

Breathtaking Views
Buckhorn Mountain Ranch extends almost six miles east to west and more than five miles north to south and encompasses altogether more than 10 square miles of deeded acreage. To the west, the Uncompahgre Plateau rolls toward the Utah border and some of the most spectacular sunsets ever to turn the sky blaze orange. Storm King Peak rises in the east.  The magnificent San Juan Mountains frame the southern horizon. On the ranch itself, the vistas sweep from the ridge above Scotty’s Draw to Waterdog Peak.

Terrain
The Buckhorn Mountain Ranch has spectacularly diverse terrain and a wide variety of vegetation that changes dramatically over a 3,000-foot rise in elevation. Near ranch headquarters, the land is largely flat to gently rolling with open pastures and a few scattered cedar groves. Domesticated grasses, including orchard and brome, grow in the valley, while Kentucky bluegrass grows in the riparian areas along creeks and draws. Irrigated hay meadows in the southeastern portion of the ranch are lushly green spring through summer. 

Oak brush and pinyon pine grow between 7,000 and 8,500 feet above sea level, while aspen groves and lodgepole pine forests cover the hillsides at the higher elevations.

Acreage: 

Deeded Acres: 6,573± 

Acreage Breakdown: 

Deeded Acres: 6,573± 
BLM Lease: 6,003±
Total Acres: 12,576± 

Improvements: 

Buckhorn Mountain Ranch has two large and lovely custom homes built by Allison Construction, a highly respected local contractor, as well as two cabins and a bunkhouse for guests and hunters. The main homes and ranch facilities have electricity and public water supplied by local utility companies.

Owner’s Home
This beautiful two-story house has the look of a log home but is stick-built with log slabs inside and out. Within its spacious and well-designed 3,290± square feet are 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, and large, comfortable living spaces. A covered porch wraps around two sides of the house to take advantage of the spectacular view of the San Juan Mountains.

Built with the highest quality materials, the home has 10-foot, tongue-and-groove ceilings with rustic, hand-hewn beams salvaged from an old sawmill. The floors are made from 5-inch oak planks. Two large wood-burning fireplaces built of native stone stand at each end of a large combined living and dining room. Interior walls are Italian plaster throughout, and the windows are wood clad.

The spacious gourmet kitchen features hickory cabinets, granite countertops, and stainless steel appliances, including a Subzero® refrigerator and a 48” Viking® stove with a double oven and Thermador® vent.

The main-floor master suite has a lovely loft, a large walk-in closet, and French doors that open onto a private deck with an incredible view of Mt. Sneffels and the San Juan Mountain range. The en-suite bathroom has a Travertine® marble floor, steam shower, and large double vanity.

On the second floor there are three bedrooms, including a suite with an attached bath, and two bedrooms that share a Jack-and-Jill bathroom.

The basement has a built-in wine cellar, gun vault, and a utility room with cabinets.

Other features include a main-floor laundry room, interior and exterior entertainment centers, radiant floor heat, evaporative cooler, a security system, a wind generator with a battery backup, and a detached heated, two-car garage.

There also is a 747± sq. ft. studio apartment above the garage with a kitchen, bath, heat and airconditioning.

Manager’s Home
The 3,278 sq. ft. manager’s home has 6 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. The exterior is board and batten and the interior features engineered wood floors for durability and easy maintenance. The home also has a security system and supplemental solar power.

A stone fireplace with a wood-burning insert anchors the large central living and dining room.

A main-floor bedroom, ideal for guests, has a full bathroom and private entrance.

Other features include a main-floor laundry room with half bath, bronze hardware, an evaporative cooler, and a supplemental solar system that provides power to the workshop and a third of the house.

The country kitchen features a dining island and GE Profile® stainless steel appliances.

The master suite with private bath, four bedrooms, and two additional bathrooms is upstairs.

The 1,911± sq. ft. detached garage has in-floor heat and four bays, including two for private vehicles and two for ranch vehicles.

There is also a 1,023± sq. ft. apartment above the garage with a small kitchen, living/dining room, full bath, separate bedroom, loft, hot-water baseboard heat, and wall air conditioning.

Alpine Hunting Cabin
This rustic cabin, located at 8,900 feet above sea level, has bunk beds to sleep five, solar-powered heat, a wood-burning stove, a three-quarters bath, and a small kitchen.

Shooting Cabin
This tidy cabin has bunk beds and a fireplace but no running water or electricity. Located on the 700-yard shooting range, it has been used primarily for storage and daytime shelter.

Bunkhouse
The bunkhouse, which features original hardwood floors, has a full bath and sleeps six.

Staff housing
Two 1,848± sq. ft. modular homes built in 1979 provide housing for ranch employees.

Buckhorn Gardens
Three acres of the ranch have been set aside to grow organic produce. Buckhorn Gardens has an extensive irrigation system and four greenhouses, including a 150’x20’ walpini, and a greenhouse constructed partially underground to keep plants cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Garden produce is sold at local farmers markets and to wholesale customers in the area.

 

Climate: 

A high desert climate brings lots of sunshine, pleasantly low humidity, warm summers, and generally milder winters to the lower elevations of the ranch. At higher elevations, temperatures are 5 to 10 degrees cooler and winter snows are measured in feet not inches.

The Montrose area averages 245 sunny days a year with rainfall totals normally between 10 and 14 inches. High temperatures in July reach into the upper 80s, while January daytime highs average 39 degrees with nighttime lows near 0 degrees.

The ranch receives about 18 inches of snow a year at lower elevations, whereas the upper elevations may receive more than 5 feet of snow in a season.

General Operations: 

The Buckhorn Mountain Ranch is a true four-season cattle operation with 400± acres of irrigated hay meadows and excellent seasonal pastures. The current owner runs about 300 animal units on the deeded and leased acreage.

Ranching here is done the cowboy way—mostly on horseback. Contiguous pastures at steadily increasing elevations enable the cowboys to move the animals easily from one grazing area to the next. The cattle winter in the hay fields at lower elevations from January until May 1 when the animals are turned out into the leased BLM land where they graze for a month through Dry Gulch and past Bitter Springs before moving onto the deeded acreage at Blue Gate pasture. Throughout the summer and early fall, the cattle work their way across Beaton Creek up to Waterdog Peak and the high country on the north side of the property where they stay until the first snowfall.

“The land is all contiguous. The cattle can move in a natural manner through the ranch from spring to summer and summer to fall and fall to winter. They don’t have to be loaded and hauled and wrestled around.” – Robert Pulliam, Buckhorn Mountain Ranch manager

The irrigated acreage includes 300 tillable acres and 100 acres of pasture. In 2015, the meadows produced 408 tons of cut hay with 240 acres of grass left uncut in the pastures.

Facilities
The ranch has excellent corrals and working facilities, all designed for ease of handling cattle. Each pasture has a gate near a corral, so that cattle can be worked on the range.

The main horse barn has a concrete floor for feed storage, three stalls, and attached metal pens for foaling or training. A riding arena and a sheeted round pen also are attached through the corral system.

Other ranching facilities include a heated shop with hot water, 20,000-pound scales, outbuildings, and a calving shed.

 

Water Resources: 

All water and water rights, ditches and ditch rights, reservoir and reservoir and storage rights used upon, adjudicated for use upon or appurtenant to the property are described below (the Appurtenant Property), including but not limited to:

Buckhorn Reservoir
Montrose District Court, Water Division 4 (Case No 03CW151), 12/22/2003
∙ 70.0 acre-feet in Buckhorn Lake Reservoir No. 1
∙ 155.0 acre-feet in Buckhorn Lake Reservoir No. 2

L.V.S. Ditch
∙ 1.25 C.F.S. for supplemental irrigation of 50 acres
∙ .05 C.F.S. for stock water

Buckskin Ditch, Buckhorn Reservoir, Beaton Creek and Scotty’s Draw
∙ All interest in the Buckskin Ditch and 7. C.F.S. allowed to flow therein, Priority No. 3
∙ Undivided 7/8 interest, Buckhorn Ditch, Priority No. 1
∙ 6.25 C.F.S., Buckhorn Ditch, Priority No. 1
∙ All interest in the Buckhorn Reservoir, Priority No. 1
∙ All Seller’s interest water rights of Beaton Creek
∙ All Seller’s interest water rights of Scotty’s Draw
∙ All other water rights owned by the Seller pertaining to the described real property

Drinking water and supplemental water for livestock is provided by the Tri-County Water Conservancy District in Montrose, County.

Water for irrigation comes from Buckhorn Lakes through a system of natural drainages.

There are three irrigation storage ponds with head gates, as well as numerous stock ponds for cattle and wildlife.

Wildlife Resources: 

The hunting is naturally good on the Cimarron Ridge at the base of Storm King Peak and Buckhorn Mountain Ranch has made the best of it. Ranch personnel actively manage wildlife and hunting on the property to develop trophy-size resident mule deer and to attract migratory elk. Hunters take only bucks of 170 inches or greater to allow the animals to mature and breed back into the herd.

Large aspen groves have been set aside as sanctuaries for the deer and elk to encourage animals to migrate onto the ranch from adjoining public lands. Ranch employees also groom trails and cut back scrub oak and sagebrush to promote the growth of native grasses and the tender new shoots the animals love to eat. As a result, Buckhorn Mountain Ranch, which conducts guided hunts, is known for its exceptionally large deer, such as the 197-inch buck shot early in the 2015 season and elk of 300 inches-plus.

The ranch is located in Colorado Game Management Unit 65, which is an open unit for elk tags with deer tags available by draw. The ranch typically receives up to 5 private land vouchers and historically harvests no more than 10 bucks off the property in a year to encourage herd development.

“The whole place is real good for animals. It doesn’t matter where you go.” – John Deti, hunting manager for the Buckhorn Mountain Ranch

 

Taxes: 

Property taxes are approximately $10,034 based upon past years.

Mineral Rights: 

Seller will transfer mineral rights with no reservation, subject to past title exceptions. 

Additional Information: 

Area Attractions
Montrose, a county seat, has been a hub for agriculture and commerce since the early 20th century and the completion of the Gunnison Tunnel, which brought water for irrigation to the Uncompahgre Valley. Humans have lived here, though, for more than 3,000 years as evidenced by the petroglyphs at the Shavano Valley Rock Art Site. Today, Montrose is a regional center for health care, retail, and entertainment.

Historic and happening, Telluride is home to superb winter skiing, a thriving cultural arts scene, world-class restaurants, and more than a few artists, writers, and actors. A former mining town named after tellurium, a metalloid element never actually found here, Telluride is today at the center of southwestern Colorado’s cultural and winter sports scene. A free gondola connects Telluride to Mountain Village at the base of the ski area.

Ouray likes to call itself the “Switzerland of America” and in fact, this former mining town nestled in a valley surrounded on three sides by steep peaks is as quaintly beautiful as it is historic. Two-thirds of the town’s original Victorian buildings have been preserved. People come to Ouray for ice-climbing and for the natural hot springs.

The Black Canyon of the Gunnison near Montrose is, as the National Park Service notes, “big enough to be overwhelming and still intimate enough to feel the pulse of time.” With its steep cliffs and rock spires, the canyon tests hikers while fishermen, boaters, and kayakers find challenges on the river.

The “Gateway to the San Juans,” Ridgway supports an eclectic arts scene. True Grit, starring John Wayne, and How the West was Won were filmed in and around this historic mining town and former railroad stop. 

MOAB, UTAH
Home to two of the America’s most famous national parks, Moab is less than three hours west through the Paradox Valley and over the La Sal mountains.

Arches National Park, located just five miles north of Moab, boasts the world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches—more than 2,000 in all—along with an awe-inspiring variety of natural geological formations.

The vastness and amazing diversity of Canyonlands National Park, 32 miles from Moab, boggle the mind and offer endless opportunities for hiking, camping, and whitewater rafting through Cataract Canyon.

Broker Comments: 

A ranch with the size and attributes of the Buckhorn Mountain Ranch doesn’t come to market very often in such a prime location. While the property itself is superb, its proximity to Montrose, Black Canyon Jet Center and Telluride also adds to the overall value. Well-appointed and functional improvements are accessible and located discreetly at the base of the property. All of the land is contiguous. The topography and elevation vary significantly, as the terrain rises to the pristine upper country where the views of the San Juan Mountains are dramatic. Buckhorn Mountain Ranch is located in the epicenter of southwestern Colorado, an area with rich recreational opportunities and a year-around climate that supports and encourages outdoor activities.

Sources/Footnotes: 

 ** Some of the outstanding photography herein was provided by Buckhorn Mountain Ranch. (Contact information is available upon request.)

The Facts: 
  • Acreage: 6,573± deeded / 6,003± leased acres 
  • Elevation at headquarters: 6,700 feet above sea level
  • Address: 72420 Buckhorn Road, Montrose, CO 81403
  • Counties: Montrose and Ouray
  • 14 miles south of Montrose
  • 19 miles north of Ridgway
  • Ranching facilities: corrals, riding arena/horse paddock, calving shed, 20K-lb scale, maintenance facilities, irrigation equipment
  • Owner’s home: 3,290± sq. ft., 4 beds/3.5 baths, 2 fireplaces, 2-car detached garage
  • Manager’s home: 3,278± sq. ft., 6 beds/4.5 baths, 4-bay detached garage 
  • Bunkhouse, three cabins, six heated hunting blinds
  • Staff housing: two 1,848± sq. ft. modular homes
  • Colorado Game Management Unit: 65
  • Airport: Montrose Regional Airport, 16 miles from ranch
Additional Services: 

MANAGEMENT SERVICES – Hall and Hall’s Management Division has a very clear mission – To represent the owner and to ensure that his or her experience is a positive one. Services are customized to suit the owner’s needs. They often begin with the recruiting and hiring of a suitable ranch manager or caretaker and are followed by the development of a management or operating plan along with appropriate budgets. Ongoing services include bill paying, ranch oversight, and consulting services as needed. Even the most sophisticated and experienced ranch owners appreciate the value of a management firm representing them and providing advice on local area practices and costs. Wes Oja and Jerome Chvilicek at (406) 656-7500 or Randy Clavel at (308) 534-9000 are available to describe and discuss these services in detail and welcome your call.


RESOURCE ENHANCEMENT SERVICES – Increasingly the value of a ranch is measured by the quality of each and every one of its resources. Coincidentally the enhancement of a ranch’s resources also increases the pleasure that one derives from the ownership of a ranch. Our management services have included the assessment of everything from wildlife habitat to bird habitat to water resources and fisheries and the subsequent oversight of the process involved with the enhancement of these resources. Wes Oja or Jerome Chvilicek at (406) 656-7500 are available to describe and discuss these services in detail and welcome your call.


AUCTIONS - Hall and Hall Auctions offers “Another Solution” to create liquidity for the owners of Investment-Quality Rural Real Estate. Our auction team has experience in marketing farmland, ranchland, timberland and recreational properties throughout the nation. Extreme attention to detail and complete transparency coupled with Hall and Hall’s “rolodex” of over 40,000 targeted owners and buyers of rural real estate help assure that there are multiple bidders at each auction. In addition the unique Hall and Hall partnership model creates a teamwork approach that helps to assure that we realize true market value on auction day. For more information on our auction services contact Scott Shuman at (800) 829-8747.


SPECIALIZED LENDING - Since 1946 Hall and Hall has created a legacy by efficiently providing capital to the intermountain west. In addition to traditional farm and ranch loans, we specialize in understanding the unique aspects of placing loans on ranches where value may be influenced by recreational features, location and improvements and repayment may come from outside sources. Our extensive experience and strong relationships with our lenders allows us to quickly tell you whether we can provide the required financing.

Competitive Pricing • Flexible Terms • Efficient Processing
In-House Appraisals • Common Sense Underwriting
Dave Roddy • (406) 656-7500
Mike Hall or Judy Chirila • (303) 861-8282
Randy Clavel • (308) 534-9000
Monte Lyons • (806) 698-6882

Disclaimer: 

In Colorado, Buyers should be aware that different real estate brokerage relationships are available which include seller agency, buyer agency or transaction-brokerage.

BROKERAGE DISCLOSURE TO BUYER

 

Definitions of Working Relationships:

Seller’s Agent:
A seller’s agent (or listing agent) works solely on behalf of the seller to promote the interests of the seller with the utmost good faith, loyalty and fidelity. The agent negotiates on behalf of and acts as an advocate for the seller. The seller’s agent must disclose to potential buyers all adverse material facts actually known by the seller’s agent about the property. A separate written listing agreement is required which sets forth the duties and obligations of the broker and the seller.

Buyer’s Agent:
A buyer’s agent works solely on behalf of the buyer to promote the interests of the buyer with the utmost good faith, loyalty and fidelity. The agent negotiates on behalf of and acts as an advocate for the buyer. The buyer’s agent must disclose to potential sellers all adverse material facts actually known by the buyer’s agent including the buyer’s financial ability to perform the terms of the transaction and if a residential property, whether the buyer intends to occupy the property. A separate written buyer agency agreement is required which sets forth the duties and obligations of the broker and the buyer.

Transaction-Broker:
A transaction-broker assists the buyer or seller or both throughout a real estate transaction by performing terms of any written or oral agreement, fully informing the parties, presenting all offers and assisting the parties with any contracts, including the closing of the transaction without being an agent or advocate for any of the parties. A transaction-broker must use reasonable skill and care in the performance of any oral or written agreement, and must make the same disclosures as agents about all adverse material facts actually known by the transaction-broker concerning a property or a buyer’s financial ability to perform the terms of a transaction and if a residential property, whether the buyer intends to occupy the property. No written agreement is required.

Customer:
A customer is a party to a real estate transaction with whom the broker has no brokerage relationship because such party has not engaged or employed the broker, either as the party’s agent or as the party’s transaction-broker.

Please contact one of the Hall and Hall brokers for a complete discussion of potential working relationships for this property.  A written relationship disclosure will be provided to a prospective buyer prior to engaging in brokerage activities as defined by the Colorado Real Estate Commission. 

NOTICE: Offering is subject to errors, omissions, prior sale, change or withdrawal without notice, and approval of purchase by owner. Information regarding land classifications, acreages, carrying capacities, potential profits, etc., are intended only as general guidelines and have been provided by sources deemed reliable, but whose accuracy we cannot guarantee. Prospective buyers should verify all information to their satisfaction. Prospective buyers should also be aware that the photographs in this brochure may have been digitally enhanced.