For Sale

Rosewood Avalon

$14,500,000 Lamont, FL 3,650± Deeded Acres

Executive Summary

PRELIMINARY INFORMATION - Rosewood Avalon is a beautiful quail plantation consisting of 3,650± acres in Jefferson County, Florida in the southern portion of the Red Hills region and in a neighborhood of other high-quality plantations such as Turkey Scratch, Oak Hill, El Destino, and Pinewoods. Rosewood Avalon is a beloved portion of the much larger 30,000+ acre Avalon Plantation and has been managed for wildlife, notably quail, but offers excellent deer and turkey hunting opportunities along Branch Mill Creek. The quail courses meander through stands of gorgeous old pines and along beautifully rolling topography. The current owner has been one of our country’s most dedicated conservationists, and Rosewood Avalon has been the beneficiary of his passion for land in how well it has been cared for over the years.

Just the Facts

  • 3650± acre Red Hills quail plantation in Jefferson County, Florida 
  • Beautiful, mature timbered quail courses and gorgeous rolling hills
  • One of the beloved holdings of the 30,000+ acre Avalon Plantation
  • Located at US 19 and HWY 27 south of Monticello in an exclusive neighborhood of other plantations including Turkey Scratch, El Destino, Oak Hill, and Pinewoods 
  • Northern gate less than 2 miles to I-10, 8 minutes to Monticello, 30 minutes to Thomasville, and approx.. 20 minutes to the east side of Tallahassee
  • Well managed timber program with strong timber value
  • Branch Mill Creek flows through the property providing excellent habitat for deer and turkey
  • Exceptional stands of hardwoods
  • Great location for accessing recreational opportunities along the Big Bend of Florida with nearby Aucilla and Wacissa Rivers within minutes and the Gulf less than an hour from Rosewood
  • 2.5± miles of frontage on HWY 27/19, approx. 2 miles on US 19, and 5.5± miles on WPA Road
  • Historic records for Rosewood Plantation date back to Burnwell McBride who moved to Florida from South Carolina in the 1830s. The land was eventually in the hands of his granddaughter and her husband, Asa May, considered one of the wealthiest planters in north Florida during his time.